The Lovely Italian Princess & the Erudite Spanish Reformer: Giulia Gonzaga & Juan de Valdés in the 16th century Reformation

By Alejandro Moreno Morrison

[Nota Bene: To read the footnotes, please scroll down to the bottom of the page.]

Upon personal invitation of the emperor Charles V, the 22 years-old Giulia Gonzaga Colonna, Duchess of Trajetto, Dowager Countess of Fondi, and Dowager Duchess of Gaeta, moved to Naples in December 1535.[1]  Giulia, “illustrious by birth, was still more so by her mental and personal endowments.”[2]  “Admirable woman of… aristocratic and thorough beauty,” as shown in her portrait kept in the British Museum,[3] Giulia was wooed by Ippolito Di’Medici, and variously celebrated by poets, painters, scholars, and noblemen.  The fame of her beauty reached such international proportions that, in the summer of 1534, Barbarossa, admiral of the Turkish-Ottoman fleet, almost succeeded in kidnapping her for the harem of sultan Soliman II.[4]  But God had a wonderful plan for her life, having predestined her for salvation before the foundation of the world.

But how could she come to saving faith in Christ and in Him alone when her religion taught her to merit salvation by works and not to acknowledge it as coming by grace alone to be received through faith alone?  How could she believe a gospel she had never heard?  And who could possibly be the preacher suited to her peculiar circumstances?  Although the gospel of salvation by grace alone through faith alone was being preached already all over Europe, on Giulia’s side of the Alps and of the social gap such message was perceived with the political taints of a German revolt against the unity of the empire[5] and Christendom, and further tainted by the 1527 sack of Rome in which some German Lutherans were involved.

Years before, Spanish nobleman Ferrando (or Hernando) de Valdés, Perpetual Regent of Cuenca, Spain,[6] had three children among whom two stand out in history: Alfonso (b. ca. 1501) and Juan (b. ca. 1509).[7]

Alfonso de Valdés studied Latin and Law under royal tutor Pedro Mártir de Anglería,[8] whose assistance “helped secure Alfonso a future place in [emperor] Charles’s service”[9] at the imperial court.  Alfonso was present at the coronation of Charles V[10] and not much later became his Latin Secretary,[11] and some years later his Chief Secretary.[12]  Alfonso was present at Luther’s trial at the Diet of Worms.[13]  But the German monk did not produce any favourable first impression on the Spanish courtier, who called Luther “audacious, shameless,” his books “poisonous,”[14] and his followers “prone to evil.”[15]  Yet, he agreed on the need for a reformation and was dissatisfied with the way in which Rome was handling the Luther affair.[16]  “Alfonso’s name is found subscribed to imperial letters of the years 1526 and 1527, addressed to Pope Clement VII and to the College of Cardinals, in which a General Council is most energetically demanded.”[17]  That was exactly what Luther had originally requested. Through his writings and imperial politics, Alfonso pursued a reformation programme along the lines proposed by Erasmus, of whom he was protector[18] and friend, and who held both Valdés brothers, Alfonso and Juan, in very high esteem.[19]

Juan spent his youth years in the Spanish royal court,[20] and later went on to study at Universidad Complutense[21] (most likely Humanities and Canon Law).[22]  He was well versed in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew and mastered the Spanish (Castilian) language.[23]  In January 1529, Juan published Dialogue on Christian Doctrine, which ignited against himself the hostility of the Spanish Inquisition.  Providentially, his case was appointed to scholars of his alma mater who were sympathetic to him, while enjoying also the favourable intervention of other people in prominence (including the General Inquisitor), all of which finally secured his absolution.

Around the same time, Alfonso de Valdés also provoked the wrath of the Spanish Inquisition with his writings, but such was his political power and influence that in 1530 he got an ample charter of absolution for his whole family from Clement VII, the pope he had attacked in his writings.[24]

By 1531 Juan had found refuge from the Spanish Inquisition in Clement’s papal court with the honorary title of Chamberlain[25] and the honorary dignity of Imperial Secretary with some semi-official role as Imperial agent.[26]  At Clement’s court Juan enjoyed the confidence of Pietro Carnesecchi, the pope’s Secretary and later Protonotary of the Apostolic See –a man so influential that it was believed “that he… wielded the pontifical power.”[27]

Meanwhile, Alfonso was travelling with the Emperor through Germany and having meetings with Melanchthon at Augsburg.

The intercourse between the two [Alfonso and Melanchthon] was a very friendly one, and with the sovereign, Valdés successfully set off the conciliatory and reasonable tone of the Protestants, and smoothed the way for a public reading of [the Augsburg Confession] in the presence of the Emperor…  It was with pleasure that he saw the Emperor… constrained to yield great liberty to the evangelical movement.[28]

Alfonso died in October of 1532, and it was so reported to Henry VIII by his then ambassador in Vienna, Thomas Cranmer, who wrote to the English king about Alfonso de Valdés in very complimentary terms.[29]

By 1535, after the death of pope Clement VII, Juan de Valdés became imperial agent and moved to Naples, which would become his home place for the rest of his short life, and his missionary field.  Variously described by his contemporaries as “Gentleman of cape and sword,” “noble and wealthy knight,” “prudent and learned man,” of “courtly bearing”[30] and “patient spirit,” [31] “of handsome looks, very sweet manners and of smooth and attractive speech,”[32] Valdés enjoyed the friendship of “the most distinguished members of the aristocracy of Italy of their period.”[33]  He used to gather them at his country house on the Riviera di Chiaia[34] –“one of the most beautiful places on earth”.[35]

Here Valdés received on the Sunday a select number of his most intimate friends; and they passed the day together in this manner: after breakfasting and enjoying themselves amidst the glories of the surrounding scenery, they returned to the house, when he read some selected portion of Scripture, and commented upon it, or some ‘Divine consideration’ which had occupied his thoughts during the week—some subject on which he conceived that his mind had obtained a clearer illumination of heavenly truth.[36]

Juan’s circle included scholars, literati, cardinals, archbishops, bishops, noblemen, and “the most noble and discrete women of Naples,”[37] such as the poetess Vittoria Colonna (1490-1547), friend of Baldassare Castiglione (author of Il Cortegiano) and Michelangelo’s Platonic love, and the young noble Giulia Gonzaga Colonna.[38]  It would be Giulia toward whom Juan’s mind would be “most forcibly brought into exercise.  Her noble faculties, her pursuit of the highest virtue, and the loveliness of her mind and person alike engaged his regard.”[39]

Juan de Valdés was probably first recommended to Giulia as legal advisor on a litigation brought about by the death of her husband.[40]  However, as confidence ripened between the two during the Lent season of 1536, it became apparent that Giulia’s core needs were not legal but spiritual, and that her legal advisor’s chief gifts were in biblical exposition, theology, and pastoral care.  One day, Giulia and Juan attended one of the Lenten sermons by Bernardino Ochino in company with emperor Charles V, his court, and the whole of Neapolitan society.  The whole audience, including the Emperor and Giulia, was deeply moved, and for Valdés the experience was apparently “akin to… a religious conversion.” [41]

Although “Valdés was undoubtedly the superior intelligence, and was further advanced in ‘Paulinism’”[42] and the doctrine of justification by faith, Ochino’s sermon was somehow used by the Holy Spirit to transform that knowledge into passionate action, moving Juan to display the fullness of his theological abilities and devoting to it increasingly more of his interest and time.

As a result, Juan first wrote Alfabeto christiano to address Giulia’s spiritual thirst.  Furthermore, the gatherings with his influential and aristocratic friends became opportunities for biblical exposition, theological discussion and, most of all, for the preaching of the gospel of salvation by grace alone through faith alone.  Valdés promoted the reading of works by John Calvin, Martin Luther, Martin Bucer, and Ulrich Zwingli, among such people as Carnesecchi, Ochino, Benedetto, and Pietro Martire Vermigli.  It was through Juan de Valdés that Vermigli was first nurtured in the gospel to become later one of the chief theologians of the Reformation.[43]  Thus, Valdés had a direct influence upon the two most influential pulpits in Naples, the ones held by Vermigli and Ochino.  Valdés’s writings reached as far as the influential cardinal Gasparo Contarini who, in striving for a reformation of the western Church from within and from the top, would later recommend Vermigli to be appointed for reformation commissions on two occasions.[44]

Notwithstanding the above, the first and special object of the theological works of this “Dottore e Pastore of noble and illustrious persons”[45] was the spiritual growth of his dearest friend Giulia –“the one who drank deepest of his instructions.”[46]  It was for Giulia that Juan translated the Scriptures into Spanish and for whom he wrote his Bible commentaries also in Spanish.  It was to Giulia that Juan dedicated his translation and Commentaries to the Epistles of Saint Paul, his translation and Commentary to the Psalms, and his translation and Commentary to the Gospel According to Matthew.[47]  “Possibly no man ever lived that did more by word and by writings to teach another spiritual truth, than did Valdés for Julia.”[48]

Juan de Valdés died in 1541, right before the beginning of the Italian Inquisition’s persecution in Naples and six years before the Council of Trent’s Decretum iustificatione against the doctrine of justification by faith alone.  In spite of his Protestant views, Valdés did not separate formally from the Roman Church, as he was never forced to make that choice.  More than attacking Rome, he “confined himself to the inculcation of what he believed to be Divine truth.”[49]

From the peculiar vantage point of his time (before the Council of Trent) and of his influential position, the hope for a Reformation from within and from the top was not ungrounded.  Juan de Valdés’s life, influence, and reformist ministry among the aristocracy and high clergy in Italy stand indeed as an incontestable witness to the fact that every possibility for a reformation without separation was exhausted, and that the Vatican, having turned its back deliberately and explicitly against the biblical and apostolic faith, cannot possibly be the one holy, catholic and apostolic Church.

Juan de Valdés’s ministry succeeded in overcoming socio-economic and socio-political hindrances that would have prevented many in the aristocracy south of the Alps to embrace the biblical doctrine of the gospel of grace.  Thousands of people who otherwise would have never heard the gospel of justification by faith alone came to saving faith in Christ, including the princess whom God had predestined for salvation and preserved from the hands of the Sultan, and who is now enjoying the presence of Christ, her Saviour, and life everlasting in God’s glory.

[Editorial note: The first version of this text was originally written for and published in The Progress of St. Paul’s (the monthly newsletter of St. Paul’s Church (Presbyterian Church in America), Orlando, Florida, ca. Oct. 2000  This is a revised version (Oct. 28, 2017).]


[1] Giulia Gonzaga, born in 1513, got married in 1526 to Vespaciano Colonna (born in 1485), Count of Fondi and Duke of Gaeta, who died on March 13, 1528.  See Philip McNair, An Anatomy of Apostasy (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1967), p. 31; and http://www.visitaitri.it/nuova_pagina_1.htm.

[2] John T. Betts “Preface” to his edition of Juan de Valdés, Commentary upon the Gospel of St. Matthew (London: Trubner & Co., 1882), p. viii.

[3] Marcelino Menéndez-Pelayo, Historia de los heterodoxos españoles: Erasmistas y protestantes. Sectas místicas.  Judaizantes y moriscos.  Artes mágicas (México: Porrúa, 1995, reprint of the 1882 ed.), p. 104.

[4] Cf. McNair, op. cit., p. 30.

[5] See Menéndez-Pelayo, op. cit., pp. 55 & 84.

[6] See ibid., p. 54.

[7] The year of birth of both these siblings is unclear.  The ambiguity is connected to the fact that two sources seem to suggest that Alfonso and Juan were twins.  The main source of the ambiguity and possible confusion is a letter from Erasmus to Juan (March 21, 1529), in which Erasmus refers to both as twins (gemellos), although it could have been an allusion to the likeness between the two siblings (see ibid., p. 84, and José C. Nieto, Juan de Valdés y los orígenes de la Reforma en España e Italia, 1st Spanish ed. (México: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1979, corrected and augmented from the 1st English ed., 1970), p. 176).  One of the reasons to doubt they were twins is the fact that Alfonso was already Secretary to emperor Charles V when Juan was still a student in Escalona, Spain.  Therefore, it is most likely that, as Nieto thinks (see ibid.), Juan was younger than Alfonso.  Consequently, the most likely explanation for the two dates given for the birth of Alfonso a Juan is that Alfonso was born ca. 1501, and Juan ca. 1509.

[8] Pedro Mártir de Anglería was an “Italian humanist brought to the Spanish royal court by Ferdinand and Isabel to provide such instruction” (Daniel A. Crews, Twilight of the Renaissance: The Life of Juan de Valdés (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2008), p. 15).

[9] Ibid.

[10] Menéndez-Pelayo, op. cit., p. 55.

[11] See Nieto, op. cit., p. 281.

[12] As reported by Thomas Cranmer in 1532, while Cranmer was Henry VIII’s ambassador to the imperial court (see Menéndez-Pelayo, op. cit., p. 56).

[13] See ibid.

[14] See ibid.

[15] Ibid.

[16] See ibid.

[17] Edward Boehmer, Lives of the Twin Brothers Juán and Alfonso de Valdés (London: Trubner & Co., 1882), p. 16.

[18] See Menéndez-Pelayo, op. cit., pp. 58-9.

[19] John Stoughton, Footprints of Italian Reformers (London: The Religious Tract Society, 1881), p. 107.  Menéndez-Pelayo interprets a paragraph by Francisco de Enzinas (an acquaintance of both Valdés brothers) as implying that it was Alfonso who inculcated into Juan the “reformist ideas” (op. cit., p. 85).

[20] The Valdés family was very wealthy and politically powerful (see Crews, op. cit., p. 12).

[21] “Complutense” means “from Alcalá de Henares.”  It was in this university where the Poliglotha Complutense edition of the Bible had been prepared.

[22] Menéndez-Pelayo, op. cit., p. 84.  This author reports that many are the authors who refer to Juan de Valdés as “jurisconsulto” (jurist).

[23] See ibid., pp. 84-85.  In fact, his best-known work (still in print and widely read and studied) is his Diálogo de la lengua (ca. 1533-36), considered one of the three foundational documents of the modern Spanish language.  Juan wrote this book in Naples for non-Spanish-speakers in the imperial court eager to learn to speak proper Spanish, since that was emperor Charles V’s favourite language.

[24] Boehmer, op. cit., p. 16.

[25] Betts, in his “Introduction” to Boehmer’s Lives… explains that the post was “…that of ‘Cameriere d’onore, di spada e cappa’, meaning a chamberlain of honour, a secular, a layman, a post of honour involving no regular duties . . . they do not present themselves at the palace except when they choose to do so, and that it is usual for the Popes to send the Cardinal’s hat by them to newly-appointed Cardinals” (op. cit., p. iv).

[26] See ibid., pp. 20-21.

[27] Betts in the “Introduction” to Boehmer, Lives…, op. cit., p. vi (citing Riguccio Galluzzi, Storia del Granducato di Toscana Firenze, 1822).

[28] Boehmer, op. cit., p. 16-17.  Menéndez-Pelayo reports, nevertheless, that Alfonso found some of the propositions of the confession to be “bitter and intolerable” (op. cit., p. 70).

[29] See ibid., p. 17, and Menéndez-Pelayo, op. cit.

[30] See Stoughton, op. cit., p. 110; and Menéndez-Pelayo, op. cit., p. 94.

[31] Stoughton, op. cit.

[32] Menéndez-Pelayo, op. cit., p. 100.

[33] Betts, “Preface”, op. cit., p. viii.

[34] “On the Chiaja, not far from the rock-cut road from Naples to Pozzuoli, where tropical vegetation mingles with that of higher latitudes, and where Virgil’s tomb arrests the traveller’s attention… Juan de Valdés had a country house, not crowded into a long line of palaces and villas, but standing by itself, ‘set in verdure’, with an open view of the glorious bay, and refreshed at eventide by a cooling breeze” (Stoughton, op. cit., p. 109).

[35] Betts, “Preface,” op. cit., p. viii.

[36] “Life and Writings of Juan de Valdés”, by B. J. Wiffen, prefixed to the CX Considerations, tr. John T. Betts, p. 138.  Cited in Stoughton, op. cit., p. 109.

[37] Menéndez-Pelayo, op. cit., p. 103.

[38] The following lines by Jacob Burckhardt provide a good picture of Valdes’s social circle in Italy:

It would be juster to wonder at the secure foundations of a society which, notwithstanding these tales, still observed the rules of order and decency, and which knew how to vary such pastimes with serious and solid discussion. The need of noble forms of social intercourse was felt to be stronger than all others. To convince ourselves of it, we are not obliged to take as our standard the idealized society which Castiglione depicts as discussing the loftiest sentiments and aims of human life at the court of Guidobaldo of Urbino, and Pietro Bembo at the castle of Asolo.  The society described by Bandello, with all the frivolities which may be laid to its charge, enables us to form the best notion of the easy and polished dignity, of the urbane kindliness, of the intellectual freedom, of the wit and the graceful dilettantism, which distinguished these circles. A significant proof of the value of such circles lies in the fact that the women who were the centers of them could become famous and illustrious without in any way compromising their reputation.  Among the patronesses of Bandello, for example, Isabella Gonzaga (born an Este) was talked of unfavorably not through any fault of her own, but on account of the too-free-lived young ladies who filled her court. Giulia Gonzaga Colonna, Ippolita Sforza married to a Bentivoglio, Bianca Rangona, Cecilia Gallerana, Camilla Scarampa, and others, were either altogether irreproachable, or their social fame threw into the shade whatever they may have done amiss. The most famous woman of Italy, Vittoria Colonna (b. 1490, d. 1547), the friend of Castiglioni and Michelangelo, enjoyed the reputation of a saint. It is hard to give such a picture of the unconstrained intercourse of these circles in the city, at the baths, or in the country, as will furnish literal proof of the superiority of Italy in this respect over the rest of Europe.

The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy (Seattle: The World Wide School), Part V, Ch. IV, “Social Etiquette”).  On-line edition: http://www.worldwideschool.org/library/books/hst/european/TheCivilizationoftheRenaissanceinItaly/chap36.html

[39] Stoughton, op. cit., p. 119.

[40] See McNair, op. cit., p. 31.

[41] Ibid., p. 35.

[42] Ibid., p. 36.

[43] Vermigli became professor of Divinities at the University of Oxford during the reign of the Reformed “Boy King,” Edward VI of England.

[44] See ibid.

[45] Nieto, op. cit., p. 244 (citing Edmondo Cione, “Epistola del primo Editore” to Juan de Valdés, Le cento e dieci divine considerazioni (Milano: Fratelli Bocca, Editori, 1944), p. 527).

[46] Stoughton, op. cit., p. 119.

[47] “Juan de Valdés has the merit of having translated for the first time into our language [Spanish] any part of the New Testament” (Menéndez-Pelayo, op. cit., p. 105).  Menéndez-Pelayo, an ultra-conservative Spanish Roman-Catholic, recognizes Valdés’s translation as “faithful and accurate” (ibid., p. 106).

[48] Betts, “Introduction,” op. cit., p. vii.

[49] Stoughton, op. cit.

______________________

Alejandro Moreno Morrison is a Mexican lawyer and Reformed theologian.  He studied at Escuela Libre de Derecho (Mexico City), Reformed Theological Seminary (Orlando, Florida) and the University of Oxford.  At Reformed Theological Seminary he was teaching assistant of the Rev. Dr. Ronald H. Nash.  He was also Spanish resources consultant for the Rev. Dr. Richard L. Pratt at Third Millennium Ministries.  Alejandro has ministered as intern, teacher, or visiting preacher or teacher at churches and missions of several denominations including Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México, Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana Conservadora de México, Iglesia Presbiteriana Ortodoxa Reformada, the Presbyterian Church in America, the Presbyterian Church of Ireland, and the Reformed Presbyterian Church, North America Synod.  With the latter he was in charge of a mission congregation during 2014.  He has also been guest lecturer on Systematic Theology, Ethics, Evangelism, and Apologetics at Seminario Teológico Reformado of Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, on Contemporary Political Systems at the Faculty of Law of Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, and on Corporate law at the Massachusetts Institute of Technologies (Global Startup Lab for Mexico).  Since 2010 he is adjunct lecturer on Jurisprudence at Escuela Libre de Derecho.

Pretender adorar a Dios en cualquier forma no prescrita por Él es superstición e idolatría

Por Zacarías Ursino[1]

Traducción y notas por Alejandro Moreno Morrison.
Fragmento tomado y traducido de Commentary on the Heidelberg Catechism (traducción de la edición latina de 1616, 2ª ed. estadounidense en inglés de 1852); pp. 917-918.*

Por lo tanto, todas aquellas cosas que están opuestas a la verdadera adoración de Dios son contrarias a este segundo mandamiento; tales como 1. Idolatría, que consiste en una adoración falsa o supersticiosa de Dios.  Hay, como ya hemos resaltado, dos clases principales de idolatría.  La una… adoración dada a un dios falso…  La otra especie de idolatría es más sutil y refinada, como cuando el Dios verdadero es supuestamente adorado, pero la clase de adoración que le es dada es falsa, que es el caso cuando cualquiera imagina que está adorando u honrando a Dios haciendo cualquier cosa que no está prescrita por la ley divina.  Esta especie de idolatría es más propiamente condenada en el segundo mandamiento, y se le aplica el término superstición,** porque añade a los mandamientos de Dios las invenciones de hombres.  Son llamados supersticiosos quienes corrompen la adoración a Dios mediante sus propias invenciones.  Este culto arbitrario [Col. 2:23] o superstición es condenada en cada parte de la Palabra de Dios.  “Este pueblo de labios me honra; mas su corazón está lejos de mí.  Pues en vano me honran enseñando como doctrinas mandamientos de hombres.”  “Mirad que nadie os engañe por medio de filosofías y huecas sutilezas, según las tradiciones de los hombres, conforme a los rudimentos del mundo, y no según Cristo.”  “Nadie os juzgue en comida o bebida, todo lo cual perece con el uso, conforme a los mandamientos y doctrinas de hombres” (Mat. 15:8, 9; Col. 2:8, 16, 22, 23).

___________________

[1] Ver Brevísima nota biográfica de Zacarías Ursino, coautor del Catecismo de Heidelberg

* El Catecismo de Heidelberg, escrito por Zacarías Ursino y Jacobo Oleviano por encargo del príncipe Federico III, elector del Palatina, fue publicado en 1563.

** Previamente en la obra citada (p. 904), Ursino usa el término superstición en su sentido genérico y más común (…atribuir efectos a ciertas cosas, o a señales y palabras, que no dependen de ninguna causa física o política, si de la Palabra de Dios, y que no sucederían si no fuese por el Diablo y otras causas, aparte de las que son supuestas…  Está incluido en este vicio las predicciones, la atención especial a, e interpretación de, sueños, adivinaciones, con las señales y predicciones de adivinadores y magos…).  El uso al que se refiere en este otro punto no excluye a dicho sentido sino que lo complementa para efectos de la teología y ética cristianas.  Dicho sea de paso que este uso del término en este sentido no es nuevo en Ursino sino que está ya presente en Juan Calvino, en su exposición del 2º mandamiento (ver Institución de la religión cristiana, II, viii, 17).

__________

Ver también: La enseñanza bíblica sobre la adoración pública del Dios verdadero (video-conferencia)La música en la Iglesia occidental en tiempos previos a la ReformaSalmo 100 (para canto congregacional)Salmo 67 (para canto congregacional)Invocar el nombre de Jehová (Génesis 4:26)Puritanismo como un movimiento de avivamiento, 1 (a)La espiritualidad del culto público en la Iglesia del Nuevo TestamentoLa luz de la naturaleza es insuficiente para prescribir el culto (texto en imagen JPG)Dos sermones sobre Éxodo 32:1-33:6, episodio del becerro de oro (audios)Sermón expositivo de Éxodo Caps. 35-39, 1ª parte (audio)Sermón expositivo de Génesis 4:26, antecedente AT de invocar el nombre del Señor (audio)El 2º mandamiento prohibe las imágenes (aunque sean sólo para fines didácticos y de ornamento) — “Catecismo de Heidelberg” y comentario de UrsinoContraste entre los linajes de Caín (simiente de la serpiente) y de Set (simiente de la mujer)El “Salterio ginebrino” o “Salterio de Ginebra” en español; Sermón expositivo de Éxodo 40 (audio)Sermón temático: Soli Deo gloria (audio)El culto de la sinagoga como modelo del culto de la Iglesia apostólica.

Sermón temático: Soli Deo gloria (audio)

Por Alejandro Moreno Morrison.

Enlace al archivo de audio: Sermón: Soli Deo gloria (AMM, Oct. 30, 2016).

Sermón predicado el domingo 30 de octubre de 2016, en la misión “Monte Sión” (Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México), de la Ciudad de México.

Lecturas del culto:

  • Salmo 29
  • Levítico 10:1-11
  • Efesios 1:1-14

___________________

Ver también: La enseñanza bíblica sobre la adoración pública del Dios verdadero (video-conferencia)La música en la Iglesia occidental en tiempos previos a la ReformaSalmo 100 (para canto congregacional)Salmo 67 (para canto congregacional)Invocar el nombre de Jehová (Génesis 4:26)Puritanismo como un movimiento de avivamiento, 1 (a)La espiritualidad del culto público en la Iglesia del Nuevo TestamentoLa luz de la naturaleza es insuficiente para prescribir el culto (texto en imagen JPG)Dos sermones sobre Éxodo 32:1-33:6, episodio del becerro de oro (audios)Sermón expositivo de Éxodo Caps. 35-39, 1ª parte (audio)Sermón expositivo de Génesis 4:26, antecedente AT de invocar el nombre del Señor (audio)El 2º mandamiento prohibe las imágenes (aunque sean sólo para fines didácticos y de ornamento) — “Catecismo de Heidelberg” y comentario de UrsinoContraste entre los linajes de Caín (simiente de la serpiente) y de Set (simiente de la mujer)El “Salterio ginebrino” o “Salterio de Ginebra” en españolPretender adorar a Dios en cualquier forma no prescrita por Él es superstición e idolatríaEl culto de la sinagoga como modelo del culto de la Iglesia apostólica.

___________________

Alejandro Moreno Morrison, de nacionalidad mexicana, es un abogado y teólogo reformado.  Fue educado en la Escuela Libre de Derecho (México), el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando, y la Universidad de Oxford.  En el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando fue asistente del Rev. Dr. Richard L. Pratt, y del Rev. Dr. Ronald H. Nash.  Ha ministrado como maestro de doctrina cristiana y Biblia y como predicador en diversas iglesias y misiones de varias denominaciones incluyendo la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana Conservadora de México, la Presbyterian Church in America, la Presbyterian Church of Ireland, y la Reformed Presbyterian Church North America Synod.  Con esta última estuvo a cargo de una misión durante 2014.  También ha sido profesor invitado de Teología Sistemática, Ética, Evangelismo, y Apologética en el Seminario Teológico Reformado de la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, y de Sistemas Políticos Contemporáneos en la Facultad de Derecho de la UNAM (México).  Desde 2010 es profesor adjunto de Filosofía del Derecho en la Escuela Libre de Derecho.

El 2º mandamiento prohíbe las imágenes (aunque sean sólo para fines didácticos o de ornamento) — “Catecismo de Heidelberg” y comentario de Ursino

Por Zacarías Ursino[1] (traducción y notas de Alejandro Moreno Morrison).

Fragmento tomado y traducido de Commentary on the Heidelberg Catechism (traducción de la edición latina de 1616, 2ª ed. estadounidense en inglés de 1852); pp. 938-939, 944-945. *
  1. ¿Pero no han de tolerarse las imágenes[i] en los templos [ii] como libros para el pueblo?**

No; pues no debemos pretender ser más sabios que Dios, quien no tendrá a su pueblo enseñado por ídolos mudos, sino mediante la predicación viva de su Palabra.***

EXPOSICIÓN: Ésta es la objeción de aquéllos que conceden, de hecho, que las imágenes y estatuas de Dios y de santos no han de ser adoradas, pero mantienen que deberían ser toleradas en los templos cristianos, como libros para los laicos, y por otras causas, si tan sólo no son adoradas.  Debemos, sin embargo, mantener lo opuesto, que es que las imágenes y semejanzas de Dios, o de los santos, no han de ser toleradas en los templos cristianos sino abolidas y removidas de la vista de los hombres, ya sea que sean o no adoradas.

. . .

Objeción 4: Pero los retratos e imágenes no son adorados en las iglesias Reformadas.  Por lo tanto pueden ser toleradas.  Respuesta: 1. Dios no sólo prohíbe que las imágenes sean adoradas sino que también prohíbe que sean hechas y tenerlas una vez hechas.  No te harás imagen, etc.  2. Siempre son ocasión para la superstición**** e idolatría para los ignorantes, como la experiencia del pasado y el presente testifican abundantemente.  3. Dan a los judíos, turcos [musulmanes], paganos y otros enemigos de la iglesia ocasión para ofensa y materia para blasfemar el evangelio.

Objeción 5: Los retratos y estatuas son ornamentos en nuestros templos.  Por lo tanto pueden ser tolerados.  Respuesta: 1. El mejor y verdadero ornamento de nuestros templos es la pura e inadulterada doctrina del evangelio, el debido uso de los sacramentos, oración y adoración verdaderas conforme con la Palabra de Dios.  2. Los templos han sido construidos para que imágenes vivas de Dios sean vistas y no para ser la habitación de ídolos e imágenes mudas.  3. El ornamento del templo no debe ser contrario al mandamiento de Dios.  4. No debe ser seductor [iii] para los miembros ni ofensivo para los enemigos de la iglesia.  Pero alguien quizá replique: “La cosa en sí misma y su uso legítimo no tienen que ser quitados simplemente porque pueda ser abusada.  Las imágenes son seductoras y ofensivas meramente por accidente.  Por lo tanto, no han de ser removidas de los templos.”  Respuesta: La primera proposición es verdadera, siempre y cuando la cosa sea buena por su propia naturaleza, y su uso sea lícito, y el accidente conectado inseparablemente con ella no esté condenado por Dios.  Si no es este el caso, la cosa y su uso son ambas ilícitas, y por lo tanto de ser evitadas.  Pero las imágenes de Dios y de santos, que están puestas en nuestros templos para fines religiosos, no son ni buenas, ni su uso es lícito sino expresamente prohibido por el mandamiento de Dios.  Y no sólo eso, sino que el accidente, que es la superstición, o idolatría, invariablemente acompañan el uso de estas imágenes (sin importar las vanas pretensiones de aquellos que están más plenamente establecidos, y de su conocimiento) y es igualmente condenado por el mandamiento de Dios.

Objeción 6: Todo lo que es necesario es que los hombres, mediante la predicación del evangelio, no tengan imágenes en sus corazones.  Por lo tanto, no es necesario que sean removidas de los templos.  Respuesta: Negamos la premisa; puesto que Dios no sólo nos prohíbe tener ídolos en nuestros corazones sino también delante de nuestros ojos, viendo que no meramente desea que no seamos idólatras sino que evitemos aún la apariencia de idolatría, conforme a lo que está dicho: “Absteneos de toda apariencia de mal” (1 Tes. 5:22).  Nuevamente, tal es la depravación del corazón humano y su propensión a la idolatría, que ídolos bien pulidos y adornados, dejados ante los ojos de los hombres, muy pronta y fácilmente se asientan en el corazón y conducen a nociones falsas de religión, sin importar lo que digan algunos al contrario.  Podemos, por lo tanto, invertir el argumento y razón así: Las imágenes han de ser desarraigadas del corazón de los hombres mediante la predicación del evangelio.  Por lo tanto, han de ser también expulsadas de nuestros templos: pues la doctrina revelada a nosotros desde el cielo no meramente nos manda no darles culto y adorarlas, sino igualmente no hacerlas ni tenerlas.

catecismo-westminster-pecados-2o-mandamiento-hacer-imagenes

_______________

[1] Ver Brevísima nota biográfica de Zacarías Ursino, coautor del Catecismo de Heidelberg.

* El Catecismo de Heidelberg, escrito por Zacarías Ursino y Jacobo Oleviano por encargo del príncipe Federico III, elector del Palatina, fue publicado en 1563.

i  Nota de traducción: La palabra usada en el original en latín es imagines (plural de imago) que es cognado exacto del sustantivo castellano imágenes, es decir, que abarca todo tipo de representación gráfica.  La versión alemana usa bilder, que puede traducirse como pintura, retrato, imagen o fotografíaLa traducción al inglés de la obra de donde este fragmento está tomado usa la palabra picture, que igualmente puede traducirse como pintura, retrato, o imagen.  Es decir, que este artículo doctrinal se refiere a cualquier representación visible, no exclusivamente estatuas, y muy particularmente a retratos o pinturas.  Que no se refiere ni primaria ni exclusivamente a estatuas, queda claro más allá de toda duda de la exposición de Ursino, quien menciona más adelante estatuas e imágenes.

ii  Nota de traducción: Aunque la traducción al inglés usada recurre al sustantivo church indistintamente para iglesia y para templo, el original en latín usa la palabra templum/templis cuando se refiere a los edificios, por lo que en tales casos he traducido church como templo.

** La frase “como libros para el pueblo” que usa aquí el Catecismo de Heidelberg alude al pretexto que, según refiere Ursino, el papa Gregorio (I o “el grande”) alegó para introducir imágenes a los templos cristianos a finales del S. VI.  Ver Zacharias Ursinus, The Commentary of Dr. Zacharías Ursinus on the Heidelberg Catechism (The Synod of the Reformed Church in the U. S., 2004), p. 53.

*** Este es el texto del Catecismo de Heidelberg.  La exposición que le sigue (incluyendo las respuestas a las objeciones) es la que es de la autoría de Zacarías Ursino.

**** En la literatura reformada, el concepto de superstición se refiere a dos clases de acciones.  La primera es la más comúnmente relacionada con el término superstición (aún fuera de la teología y ética cristianas), que Ursino mismo describe así, más arriba en la obra citada:

…atribuir efectos a ciertas cosas, o a señales y palabras, que no dependen de ninguna causa física o política, ni de la Palabra de Dios, y que no sucederían si no fuese por el Diablo y otras causas, aparte de las que son supuestas…  Está incluido en este vicio las predicciones, la atención especial a, e interpretación de, sueños, adivinaciones, con las señales y predicciones de adivinadores y hechiceros… (p. 904).

A la segunda clase de acciones se refiere así Ursino:

Por lo tanto, todas aquellas cosas que están opuestas a la verdadera adoración de Dios son contrarias a este segundo mandamiento; tales como 1. Idolatría, que consiste en una adoración falsa o supersticiosa de Dios.  Hay, como ya hemos resaltado, dos clases principales de idolatría.  La una… adoración dada a un dios falso…  La otra especie de idolatría es más sutil y refinada, como cuando el Dios verdadero es supuestamente adorado, pero la clase de adoración que le es dada es falsa, que es el caso cuando cualquiera imagina que está adorando u honrando a Dios haciendo cualquier cosa que no prescrita por la ley divina.  Esta especie de idolatría es más propiamente condenada en el segundo mandamiento, y se le aplica el término superstición, porque añade a los mandamientos de Dios las invenciones de hombres.  Son llamados supersticiosos quienes corrompen la adoración a Dios mediante sus propias invenciones.  Este culto arbitrario [Col. 2:23] o superstición es condenada en cada parte de la Palabra de Dios.  “Este pueblo de labios me honra; mas su corazón está lejos de mí.  Pues en vano me honran enseñando como doctrinas mandamientos de hombres.”  “Mirad que nadie os engañe por medio de filosofías y huecas sutilezas, según las tradiciones de los hombres, conforme a los rudimentos del mundo, y no según Cristo.”  “Nadie os juzgue… conforme a los mandamientos y doctrinas de hombres (Mat. 15:8, 9; Col. 2:8, 16, 22, 23) (pp. 917-918).

iii  Nota de traducción: Que atrape o distraiga la atención.

_______________

Ver también: La espiritualidad del culto público en la Iglesia del Nuevo TestamentoLa luz de la naturaleza es insuficiente para prescribir el culto (texto en imagen JPG)Dos sermones sobre Éxodo 32:1-33:6, episodio del becerro de oro (audios)La enseñanza bíblica sobre la adoración pública del Dios verdadero (video-conferencia)Pretender adorar a Dios en cualquier forma no prescrita por Él es superstición e idolatría.

Sermón temático: Sola gracia (audio)

Por Alejandro Moreno Morrison.

Enlace al archivo de audio: Sermón: “Sola gracia” (AMM, Oct. 23, 2016).

Sermón predicado el domingo 23 de octubre de 2016, en la misión “Monte Sión” (Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México), de la Ciudad de México.

Lecturas del culto:

  • Salmo 107:1-22
  • Jeremías 31:1-10
  • Tito 3:1-11
  • Efesios 2:8

________________

Ver también:  Sobre el pecado original (Génesis 3)Sobre el pacto abrahámicoPablo sobre la justificación de Abraham en Génesis 15 (Romanos 4)Contraste entre los linajes de Caín (simiente de la serpiente) y de Set (simiente de la mujer)La correcta interpretación de Romanos 10:9-10 (monergismo vs. sinergismo)Orígenes jesuitas y pentecostales del dispensacionalismoInvocar el nombre de Jehová (Génesis 4:26)Ganancias y pérdidas (Filipenses 3:7-9)Sermón: El pacto de obras o de creación de Génesis 2:4-3:24 (audio)Sermón temático: El antiguo pacto y el nuevo pactoSerie de sermones de Hechos 1:1 al 2:41 (audios)Sermón expositivo de Joel 2 y Hechos 2:14-21 (audio)Sermón expositivo de Génesis 4:26, antecedente AT de invocar el nombre del Señor (audio)Sermón de Rut 1, antecedente AT de invocar el nombre del Señor (audio)Sermón expositivo de Éxodo 34. La ley como señal de la gracia y la elección de Dios (audio).

________________

Alejandro Moreno Morrison, de nacionalidad mexicana, es un abogado y teólogo reformado.  Fue educado en la Escuela Libre de Derecho (México), el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando, y la Universidad de Oxford.  En el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando fue asistente del Rev. Dr. Richard L. Pratt, y del Rev. Dr. Ronald H. Nash.  Ha ministrado como maestro de doctrina cristiana y Biblia y como predicador en diversas iglesias y misiones de varias denominaciones incluyendo la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana Conservadora de México, la Presbyterian Church in America, la Presbyterian Church of Ireland, y la Reformed Presbyterian Church North America Synod.  Con esta última estuvo a cargo de una misión durante 2014.  También ha sido profesor invitado de Teología Sistemática, Ética, Evangelismo, y Apologética en el Seminario Teológico Reformado de la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, y de Sistemas Políticos Contemporáneos en la Facultad de Derecho de la UNAM (México).  Desde 2010 es profesor adjunto de Filosofía del Derecho en la Escuela Libre de Derecho.

Sobre la liturgia ginebrina de Juan Calvino para la celebración de la Cena del Señor

Por Alejandro Moreno Morrison.

A principios de 1537, poco después de que sin planearlo ni quererlo Juan Calvino llegara y se quedara en la ciudad-estado de Ginebra, Guillermo Farel y él sometieron al Concilio de Ginebra, es decir, al gobierno civil de dicha ciudad el documento La forma de las oraciones eclesiásticas y cantos con la manera de administrar los sacramentos y consagrar el matrimonio conforme a la costumbre de la Iglesia antigua.

En dicho documento:

proponían edificar a la comunidad por dos medios: la frecuente celebración de la Cena del Señor y el ejercicio de la disciplina [eclesiástica].  Declararon que la Cena debía celebrarse ‘cada domingo’ debido a su abundante provecho.[1]

En su Institución de la religión cristiana, Calvino escribió, “…la Santa Cena podría ser administrada santamente, si con frecuencia, o al menos una vez a la semana, se propusiera a la Iglesia…”[2]  Y aunque a lo largo de todo su ministerio en Ginebra, Calvino buscó implementar dicha práctica nunca logró superar la resistencia del Consejo de la Ciudad, el cual ordenó que la Cena del Señor fuese administrada solamente cuatro veces al año.  Calvino “continuó manifestando su insatisfacción y, todavía en 1561, declaró: “Nuestra costumbre es defectuosa.”[3]

Una de las razones por las que Calvino toma dicha posición en cuanto a la frecuencia para la celebración de la Cena del Señor era su insistencia en guardar continuidad con la tradición[4] apostólica recibida de la Iglesia antigua como el patrón a seguir para la práctica de la Iglesia.  No es que Calvino le atribuyera autoridad a los “padres de la Iglesia” o a la Iglesia antigua, sino que apela a ellos como testigos de la práctica que ellos habían recibido (tradición) de la Iglesia apostólica en lo que había permanecido sin alteraciones que la corrompieran.  Calvino no era un innovador, alguien que buscara inventar una nueva práctica.  Calvino era un reformador, alguien que buscaba volver a la forma ideal original.  Calvino buscaba identificar el modelo de la Iglesia Antigua y limpiar dicha tradición de las corrupciones que le habían sido añadidas a lo largo de los siglos.

La estructura general del orden del servicio seguido en Ginebra en 1542 se parece asombrosamente al de las liturgias antiguas.  Aun en detalle, las nuevas formas siguen paso a paso el bosquejo general de esas liturgias… a veces las palabras son idénticas.[5]

Calvino siguió, “y probablemente tuvo bajo sus ojos, el texto preciso” de las liturgias occidentales.  En contraste con las liturgias orientales, Calvino siguió la manera occidental de consagrar los elementos eucarísticos.  Las “liturgias orientales recurren a la invocación del Espíritu Santo, y las liturgias occidentales a las palabras de la institución [1ª Corintios 11:23-30].”[6]  El formulario ginebrino tenía la misma estructura tripartita que había sido observada “en oriente hasta el siglo IV de manera asombrosa, y en detalle, recuerda partes importantes del ordinario de la misa romana.”[7]

La primera parte de la liturgia tripartita en Ginebra estaba compuesta de:

  • Invocación,
  • Canto de los salmos,
  • Confesión de pecados
  • Oración de iluminación,[8]
  • Lectura y exposición de los textos sagrados
  • Gran oración de intercesión después del sermón,
  • Lectura del Credo apostólico,
  • Lectura de la narrativa de la institución,
  • Sancta sanctis, y
  • Sursum corda.[9]

Después de pronunciar el ministro el sancta sanctis (“Lo santo para los santos”), la congregación responde: “Sólo uno es santo, etc.,” a fin de,

…proteger la santa mesa contra la profanación, negando el acceso a ella de los “extraños, es decir, aquellos que no están en la compañía de los fieles.”  Y la respuesta “Ninguno es santo, etc.,” tiene su eco en la declaración del ministro: “No venimos a declarar que somos perfectos o justos en nosotros mismos, sino al contrario, buscando nuestra vida en Jesucristo, confesamos que estamos en muerte…”[10]

Luego viene el llamado sursum corda (del Latín “¡elevemos nuestros corazones!”):

…elevemos nuestro espíritu y corazones a lo alto donde Jesucristo está en la gloria de Su Padre, de donde lo esperamos para nuestra redención.  No nos dejemos fascinar por estos elementos terrenales y corruptibles que vemos con nuestros ojos y tocamos con nuestras manos, buscándolo ahí como si estuviese encerrado en pan o vino.  Sólo entonces nuestras almas estarán dispuestas a ser nutridas y vivificadas por Su sustancia cuando sean elevadas por encima de lo terrenal, y llevadas tan alto como el cielo, para entrar al Reino de Dios donde Él mora.  Por tanto, contentémonos con tener el pan y el vino como señales y testigos, buscando espiritualmente la realidad en donde la Palabra de Dios promete que la encontraremos.[11]

“Pensando de la misma manera, la Iglesia antigua decía: ‘Sursum corda,’ y Roma repite estas palabras sin entender plenamente su sentido primitivo.”[12]

Calvino recuperó y restauró en entendimiento de la Iglesia antigua de la adoración corporativa en el Día de Reposo como una experiencia transcendente en la que la Iglesia es llevada ante el trono celestial, que es lo que implica el Sursum corda.[13]  Este es el fundamento y corazón del entendimiento de Calvino sobre la presencia de Cristo en la Cena del Señor, como lo había sido en la Iglesia hasta el S. IX (cuando fue introducida la doctrina de la transubstanciación).[14]

Según dicha doctrina romanista de la transubstanciación, en lugar de que la Iglesia sea llevada espiritualmente a la presencia de Cristo, al salón del trono del cielo, supuestamente el cuerpo humano del Señor Jesucristo es multiplicado y una parte del mismo es sacada del cielo y para descender a la tierra y estar presente de manera real (material) en “la esencia” de los elementos del sacramento–Su sangre en el vino, y Su cuerpo en el pan.

La liturgia del Calvino, junto con su articulación doctrinal de la Cena del Señor, depuró a la tradición apostólica de la contaminación y corrupción que sufrió a lo largo de los siglos, y no sólo mantuvo sino que recuperó el significado de trascendencia del sacramento de la Cena del Señor.

Más aún, en la forma de celebración de la Cena del Señor de Calvino hay referencias explícitas a la presencia espiritual de Cristo y a la alimentación espiritual que recibimos al comer Su cuerpo y beber Su sangre.  Que la posición de Calvino era completamente diferente a la de la transubstanciación ya ha quedado claro mediante la referencia hecha al Sursum corda.  Sin perjuicio de lo anterior, Calvino insistió en la dimensión milagrosa y misteriosa de la Cena del Señor.[15]  Por lo tanto, la práctica calviniana de la eucaristía (en contraste con el entendimiento y práctica zwinglianos) no es un acto unilateral de adoración en el que los creyentes traen alabanza y acción de gracias al Señor, sino una ocasión en la que el pueblo de Dios es alimentado espiritualmente recibiendo un regalo más de la gracia de Dios.[16]

Para la actualización de tal milagro, en la liturgia de Calvino no cabe la pronunciación de una fórmula sacramental “mágica” como en el “sacrificio” de la misa romana.  La liturgia de Calvino apela por fe a las promesas contenidas en las palabras canónicas inspiradas de la institución, tal y como fueron consignadas por el apóstol Pablo en su 1ª Epístola a los Corintios.[17]  En tanto que la misa romana cree en un milagro físico, material, la eucaristía reformada cree en un milagro spiritual.

Aquí no debemos ser engañados: el epíteto espiritual no es equivalente a subjetivo.  Como evidencia presentamos el artículo XXXVI de la Confesión de Rochelle: ‘Sostenemos que esto es hecho espiritualmente, no porque pongamos imaginación y fantasía en lugar de hecho y verdad, sino porque la grandeza de este misterio excede la medida de nuestros sentidos y de las leyes de la naturaleza.  En pocas palabras, por cuanto es celestial, sólo puede ser aprehendido por fe.’

Precisamente porque solamente ha de ser aprehendida por fe y porque es prometido solamente a la fe, el milagro en cuestión es de orden espiritual, puesto que la fe es ella misma un acto espiritual.[18]

Calvino no reserva las profundidades de estas verdades a los escritos y discusiones teológicas, sino que las incorpora en la liturgia, de manera que la gente esté consciente del significado e importancia del acto en el que están participando.  La exhortación que Calvino pone en boca del ministro habla de la realidad del milagro que ocurre:

Primero, entonces, creamos en estas promesas que Jesucristo, quien es verdad infalible, ha pronunciado con sus propios labios, es decir, que Él quiere hacernos participar de Su propio cuerpo y sangre, de manera que lo poseamos enteramente de tal manera que Él viva en nosotros y nosotros en Él.  Y aunque solamente vemos el pan y el vino, no dudemos que Él lleva acabo espiritualmente en nuestras almas todo lo que nos enseña externamente mediante estas señales visibles; en otras palabras, que Él es pan del cielo, para alimentarnos y sustentarnos para vida eterna.[19]

“Nuestras almas,” dice más adelante (en alusión al sursum corda), “necesitan ser elevadas por encima de todas las cosas terrenales a fin de estar dispuestas para ser alimentadas y vivificadas por Su sustancia.”

En pocas palabras, el milagro consiste en esto: que Cristo no está “encerrado en el pan y el vino;” Él está en el cielo, “en la gloria con su Padre,” y más aún, desea alimentar “por medio de su sustancia” a aquél que cree.[20]

Calvino junto con muchos otros reformadores evitaron caer en la pretensión de tener una comprensión absoluta de este misterio, pero eso no les impidió confesarlo gozosamente y gozarlo por fe.

La liturgia de Calvino estaba inspirada en el ideal de “fidelidad a la Escritura, respeto por la estructura de las liturgias antiguas, coordinación de la emoción y la inteligencia; búsqueda de verdadera espiritualidad.”[21]

[1] Bard Thompson, ed., Liturgies of the Western Church (Philadelphia: Fortress, 1961), p. 188.

[2] Juan Calvino, Institución de la religión Cristiana (Rijswijk: FELiRe, 1994), IV, xvii, 43; pp. 1117.  Calvino dedica el apartado 44 del mismo capítulo (pp. 1117-1118) a demostrar que:

…no ha sido instituido para ser recibido una vez al año; y esto a modo de cumplimiento, como ahora se suele hacer; sino más bien fue instituido para que los cristianos usasen con frecuencia de él, a fin de recordar a menudo la pasión de Jesucristo, con cuyo recuerdo su fe fuese mantenida y confirmada, y ellos se exhortasen a sí mismas a alabar a Dios, y a engrandecer su bondad…

Refiere san Lucas en los Hechos, que la costumbre de la Iglesia apostólica era como la hemos expuesto, asegurando que los fieles “perseveraban en la doctrina de los apóstoles, en la comunión unos con otros, en el partimiento del pan y en las oraciones” (Hch. 2:42).  Así se debería hacer siempre; que jamás se reuniese la congregación de la Iglesia sin la Palabra, sin limosna, sin la participación de la Cena y en la oración.  Se puede también conjeturar de lo que escribió san Pablo, que éste mismo orden se observó en la iglesia de los corintios, y es evidente y manifiesto que así se mantuvo largo tiempo después.

En el resto del apartado citado, Calvino refiere evidencia textual histórica de la Iglesia antigua, y en los apartados 45 y 46 (pp. 1118-1120) recopila el testimonio de Agustín, Crisóstomo, y Ambrosio.

[3] Bard Thompson, ed., Liturgies of the Western Church (Philadelphia: Fortress, 1961), p. 188.

[4] Aquí se usa la palabra tradición en su sentido técnico, es decir, como la transmisión a lo largo del tiempo de un cúmulo de doctrinas y/o prácticas.  Nuestra palabra castellana “tradición” proviene del latín, traditio que se refiere a la acción de pasar de la mano de uno que entrega a la mano de otro que recibe y hace suyo lo dado.  En el Nuevo Testamento las palabras griegas correspondientes son paradidomi (usada en el sentido de traditio en 1ª Corintios 11:2, 23; 15:3, 2ª Pedro 2:21, y Judas 3) y paradosis (a menudo traducida como tradición y usada en este sentido en 1ª Corintios 11:2; 2ª Tesalonicenses 2:15; y 3:6).  Esta última palabra también es la que usa el Señor Jesucristo para referirse a las tradiciones de los fariseos.  Lo que el Señor reprueba en dichos casos no es la recepción de la tradición sino que el origen de lo transmitido es puramente humano, no divino, y que con dichas tradiciones humanas los fariseos anulaban de hecho la Palabra de Dios (ver Mateo 15:2, 3, 6; Marcos 7:3, 5, 8-9, y 13).

[5] August Lecerf, “The Liturgy of the Holy Supper at Geneva in 1542,” en Richard C. Gamble, ed., Articles on Calvin and Calvinism, Vol. 10, New York: Garland, 1992; p. 208.

[6] Ibid., p. 208.

[7] Ibid., pp. 208-211.

[8] En este punto, en la liturgia reformada de Estrasburgo Calvino insertó el Decálogo.

[9] Ver ibid., p. 208.

[10] Ibid., p. 209.  Estas palabras corresponden, en la liturgia del Libro de oraciones comunes de la Iglesia de Inglaterra (1ª ed. 1549, y 2ª ed. 1552), con la primera parte de la oración de acercamiento que dice: “No tenemos la pretensión de venir a esta tu mesa, oh misericordioso Señor, confiando en nuestra propia justicia sino en tus muchas y variadas grandes misericordias.  No somos dignos ni siquiera de juntar las migajas debajo de tu mesa.  Pero tú eres el mismo Señor cuya cualidad es siempre tener misericordia; concédenos, pues, Señor de gracia… (etc.)”

[11] Traducción combinada de Thompson (op. cit., p. 207), y de John Calvin, “The Manner of Celebrating the Lord’s Supper” (in Selected Works of John Calvin: Tracts and Letters, vol. 2, Henry Beveridge and Jules Bonnet, eds., Grand Rapids: Baker, 1983; pp. 121-122).  La porción correspondiente en la liturgia del Libro de oraciones comunes de la Iglesia de Inglaterra de 1552 comienza con el sursum corda (“¡Elevemos nuestros corazones!”) que pronuncia el ministro, seguido por la respuesta de la congregación, “¡Los elevamos al Señor!”  Enseguida el ministro ora y termina dicha oración introduciendo el sanctus (¡Santo!  ¡Santo!  ¡Santo!) o trisagion (del griego, “tres veces santo”) con las palabras, ‘Por tanto te alabamos, uniendo nuestras voces con ángeles y arcángeles y con toda la compañía del cielo, que por siempre cantan este himno para proclamar la gloria de tu nombre: ¡Santo! ¡Santo! ¡Santo!’

[12] Lecerf, op. cit., p. 208.

[13] Acerca de esto, Larry Hurtado escribe:

En 1a Corintios 11:10, la curiosa referencia a los ángeles presentes en la asamblea del culto muestra cuán familiar era la idea.  Aparentemente los lectores corintios de Pablo no necesitaban mayor explicación (¡aunque a nosotros nos gustaría una explicación!).  Como los santos de Dios, los creyentes veían sus reuniones de adoración contando con la asistencia de los santos celestiales, ángeles, cuya presencia significaba la importancia celestial de sus humildes asambleas eclesiásticas en casas.  Es este sentido de que la participación del culto cristiano colectivo participa en el culto celestial lo que encuentra posteriormente expresión en las palabras tradicionales de la liturgia: “Por tanto, con ángeles y arcángeles, y con toda la compañía celestial laudamos y magnificamos tu glorioso nombre…”  El punto es que en su noción de que sus reuniones de adoración eran extensión de, y participación en, la adoración idealizada de las huestes celestiales, y en su visión de sus reuniones como siendo honradas con la presencia de los ángeles de Dios, expresaban una vívida importancia trascendente correspondiente a esas ocasiones.

Más adelante, Hurtado también escribe: ‘…desde el Nuevo Testamento existe esta noción de que la adoración debe ser entendida como la participación terrenal en la realidad espiritual…’

Larry Hurtado, At the Origins of Christian Worship: The Context and Character of Earliest Christian Devotion, Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999;  pp. 50-51, and 113.

[14] Ver Alexander Barclay, The Protestant Doctrine of the Lord’s Supper: A Study in The Eucharistic Teaching of Luther, Zwingli and Calvin; Glasgow: Jackson, Wylie & Co., 1927; Ch. XIX; y “Origen tardío de la doctrina de la transubstanciación, y temprana oposición a la misma.”

[15] En Artículos concernientes a la organización de la Iglesia y del culto en Ginebra, Calvino escribió: “Realmente somos hechos partícipes del cuerpo y sangre de Jesús, de su muerte, de su vida, de su Espíritu, de todos sus beneficios.”  Más aún, la Cena tiene el propósito de “unir a los miembros de nuestro Señor Jesucristo con su Cabeza y unos con otros en un Cuerpo” (Thompson, op. cit.).

[16] Aunque la posición doctrinal final de Zwinglio sobre la presencia del Señor en la eucaristía es similar, tal noción está ausente de su forma de celebrar la Cena del Señor.

[17] En la Edad media, la misa papista hizo adiciones espurias a dichas palabras escriturales.  Por lo tanto, la reforma de la liturgia requería eliminar tales adiciones, que es lo que hizo Calvino.

[18] Lecerf, op. cit., p. 212.

[19] Calvin, “The Manner…”, op. cit., p. 121.  El pasaje correspondiente en el (segundo) Libro de oraciones comunes (1552) sería la segunda parte de la oración de acercamiento que dice: “… concédenos pues, Señor de toda gracia, comer la carne de tu amado hijo Jesucristo, y beber de su sangre, de manera que nuestros cuerpos pecaminosos sean limpiados por Su cuerpo, y nuestras almas lavadas por medio de su preciosísima sangre, y que por siempre vivamos en Él, y Él en nosotros.”  En el Directorio para la adoración pública de Dios de la Asamblea de Westminster (1645), esto mismo encuentra expresión al instruir al ministro a, “Orar sinceramente a Dios, el Padre de toda misericordia, y Dios de toda consolación, para que conceda su presencia llena de gracia, y la obra efectiva de su Espíritu en nosotros; y de esa manera santificar estos elementos de pan y vino, y bendecir Su propia ordenanza, a fin de que recibamos por fe el cuerpo y la sangre del Señor Jesucristo, crucificado por nosotros, y de esa manera alimentarnos de Él, de manera que Él sea uno con nosotros, y nosotros uno con Él; de manera que Él viva en nosotros, y nosotros en Él, para Él que nos ha amado, y se ha dado a sí mismo por nosotros (“Sobre la celebración de la Comunión, o Sacramento de la Cena del Señor;” en Westminster Confession of Faith, Glasgow: Free Presbyterian Publications, 1958; p. 385).

[20] Lecerf, op. cit., p. 212-213.  Para un estudio del punto de vista de los reformadores de la fe en la eucaristía, ver Gordon E. Pruett, “A Protestant Doctrine of the Eucharistic Presence,” en Calvin Theological Journal, Vol. 10, No. 1, April 1975; pp. 142-174; y Barclay, op. cit.

[21] Ibid., p. 213.

Nota editoria: Tomado y adaptado de mi ensayo “The Practice of the Eucharist in the Reformed Churches.  Response Paper,” presentado para el curso de Historia del Cristianismo II (con el Dr. Frank A. James) en Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando.  Traducido al español y adaptado el 23 de julio de 2016.

________________

Ver también: Sobre los medios de graciaOrigen tardío de la doctrina de la transubstanciación, y temprana oposición a la mismaLa Cena del SeñorJuan Calvino y las oraciones públicas o colectivas Identidad confesional: Estándares de WestminsterExaltación y entronización del Señor JesucristoPresbiterianismo en la primera reforma en InglaterraIdentidad confesional: Estándares de WestminsterOración por toda la Iglesia de Cristo (usada por la congregación angloparlante en Ginebra, en tiempos de Calvino y Knox)Las oraciones públicas, colectivas, comúnes, o litúrgicas en la práctica reformadaLa música en la Iglesia occidental en tiempos previos a la ReformaSobre el bautismoLas esposas de Juan KnoxInfluencia del calvinismo y del puritanismo en el pensamiento político de las colonias británicas en el norte de América (siglos XVII y XVIII)El “Salterio ginebrino” o “Salterio de Ginebra” en españolInvocar el nombre de Jehová (Génesis 4:26)Actividad lícita en el Día de ReposoLa observancia del cuarto mandamiento en el Nuevo Testamento (video-conferencia)La enseñanza bíblica sobre la adoración pública del Dios verdadero (video-conferencia)Sobre la visión puritana del día domingoNulidad de los oficios eclesiásticos no prescritos en la Biblia.

________________

Alejandro Moreno Morrison, de nacionalidad mexicana, es un abogado y teólogo reformado. Fue educado en la Escuela Libre de Derecho (México), el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando, y la Universidad de Oxford.  En el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando fue asistente del Rev. Dr. Richard L. Pratt, y del Rev. Dr. Ronald H. Nash.  Ha ministrado como maestro de doctrina cristiana y Biblia y como predicador en diversas iglesias y misiones de denominaciones como la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana Conservadora de México, la Presbyterian Church of America, la Presbyterian Church of Ireland, y la Reformed Presbyterian Church North America Synod.  Con esta último estuvo a cargo de una misión durante 2014.  También ha sido profesor invitado de Teología Sistemática, Ética, Evangelismo, y Apologética en el Seminario Teológico Reformado de la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, y de Sistemas Políticos Contemporáneos en la Facultad de Derecho de la UNAM (México).  Desde 2010 es profesor adjunto de Filosofía del Derecho en la Escuela Libre de Derecho.

Orígenes jesuitas y pentecostales del dispensacionalismo

Por Alejandro Moreno Morrison.

La primera aparición en la historia de la Iglesia de una interpretación dispensacional y plenamente futurista del Apocalipsis fue invento del teólogo jesuita español Francisco Ribera (1537-1591).  Nunca antes en la historia de la Iglesia se había interpretado de esa manera el Apocalipsis ni mucho menos la Biblia.

Ribera fue un teólogo de la Universidad de Salamanca que militó en la contrarreforma católicorromana.  En su libro In sacrum beati Ioannis apostoli, & evangelistiae Apocalypsin Commentarij[1] (publicado en 1590), Ribera desarrolló su interpretación futurista y dispensacional del Apocalipsis con el fin de responder y rebatir la interpretación historicista que de dicho libro hacían muchos protestantes, identificando al Vaticano y al papado con el anticristo o “la gran ramera” del Apocalipsis.

Pocos años después (ca. 1593), otro teólogo jesuita militante en la contrarreforma católicorromana, el italiano Roberto Belarmino (1542-1621), publicó Disputationes de controversiis christianae fidei adversus hujus temporis hereticos,[2] un libro de apologética catolicorromana en el que recogió y defendió la interpretación futurista y dispensacional del Apocalipsis, propuesta por primera vez por Ribera, para defender a la Iglesia romana de los ataques de los protestantes.[3]

En 1791, casi 200 años después de la publicación del libro de Belarmino, el jesuita Manuel de Lacunza (1731-1801), activo en Santiago de Chile, escribió el libro La venida del Mesías en gloria y magestad (sic),[4] bajo el nombre de Juan Josafat Ben Ezra, “hebreo-cristiano.”  De Lacunza enseñaba una escatología futurista, premilenialista, y con inclinaciones sionistas y judaizantes.  De Lacunza retoma en su libro las ideas escatológicas inventadas por Ribera y desarrolladas por Belarmino.  Aunque escrito en 1791, el libro de De Lacunza fue publicado hasta 1812.[5]

Catorce años después, a principios de 1826, el pastor presbiteriano escocés Edward Irving (1792-1834) leyó el libro La venida del Mesías en gloria y magestad de De LacunzaIrving pastoreaba la congregación de la Iglesia de Escocia en Londres,[6]  y un año antes había caído bajo la influencia de Hatley Frere, un premilenialista laico aficionado a la especulación en torno a las profecías bíblicas.[7]

Ese mismo año (1826), Irving publicó el libro Babilon and Infidedlity Foredoomed (Babilonia y la infidelidad ya condenadas a la perdición).  En dicho libro Irving pronosticó que la segunda venida del Señor sería en 1864.  También reconoció en ese libro la influencia que sobre él había tenido Frere.

En 1827, Irving publicó su traducción al inglés del libro del jesuita De Lacunza, bajo el título The Coming of Messiah[8] (La venida de Mesías).  En el prefacio, Irving expone sus propias ideas escatológicas, incluyendo la restauración de los dones carismáticos de profecía y lenguas como señal de un segunda estadío en la vida cristiana—otra innovación doctrinal sin precedente en la historia de la Iglesia.[9]

En el verano de 1828, un año después de publicar su traducción al inglés del libro de De Lacunza, Irving visitó Edimburgo, Escocia, con motivo de la celebración de la Asamblea General de la Iglesia de Escocia, y aprovechó para difundir sus ideas escatológicas a multitudes ávidas de escucharlo en distintas iglesias en Escocia.

También en 1828 (quizá bajo la influencia de Samuel Taylor Coleridge y sintiéndose ya “libre de las ataduras de la tradición recibida” y “disfrutando de la dirección directa del Espíritu Santo”), Irving publicó The Doctrine of Incarnation Opened (La doctrina de la encarnación abierta), donde dice que el Señor Jesucristo tuvo una naturaleza pecaminosa.[10]   La oposición de la Iglesia a sus herejías le parecía a Irving una señal más de la decadencia de la Iglesia que había comenzado a pronosticar desde 1825.

En noviembre de 1826, tuvo lugar el primer “congreso profético” auspiciado por Henry Drummond[11] en su opulenta mansión campirana, Albury Park (en Surrey, Inglaterra).  En dicho primer “congreso profético,” que duró una semana, Irving promovió el libro del jesuita De Lacunza (que a su vez recoje las ideas de los jesuitas Ribera y Belarmino) junto con sus propias ideas escatológicas pesimistas, dispensacionales y premileniales.

De dicho “congreso profético” surgió el Círculo de Albury, llamado así por las reuniones anuales (llamadas congresos o conferencias proféticas) que tuvieron lugar (entre 1826 y 1830) en dicha mansión de Drummond, quien convocó y organizó a dicho círculo (todos ellos amigos suyos), para discutir las especulaciones escatológicas de Irving y otros temas relacionados de interés para los participantes.  Los congresos proféticos iniciados en Albury Park continuaron llevándose a cabo (1830-1834) en Powerscourt Castle, un castillo cerca de Dublín, Irlanda, propiedad de Lady Powerscourt, miembro del Círculo de Albury.

Hacia este Círculo de Albury pueden trazarse los orígenes, no sólo del dispensacionalismo, sino también del carismatismo y del “sionismo cristiano.”

En 1830, Irving comenzó a difundir las “revelaciones” de Margaret McDonald[12] según las cuales la segunda venida del Señor Jesucristo se dividiría en dos episodios, siendo el primero un “rapto secreto” (una venida “invisible”) de los verdaderos creyentes, antes de la aparición del anticristo y la “tribulación.”[13]

Algunos de los clérigos que formaron parte del Círculo de Albury continuaron difundiendo y expandiendo las ideas de Irving.  Uno de ellos fue John Nelson Darby (1800-1882).  Aunque originalmente episcopal (anglicano irlandés), ordenado como diácono en la Iglesia de Irlanda en 1825, Darby fue uno de los fundadores del movimiento anti-eclesiástico y separatista “Hermanos de Plymouth” (Plymouth Brethren), en Dublín, Irlanda, alrededor de 1825.  En 1828 Darby renunció finalmente a su posición en la Iglesia de Irlanda (en Wicklow) para dedicarse por completo a liderar el movimiento de los “Hermanos.”

En 1830 Darby asistió al congreso de profecías bíblicas en Powerscourt Castle, en donde Irving le habló de la “revelación” que había tenido Margaret McDonald.  A instancias de Irving, Darby visitó a Margaret McDonald en su hogar en Port Glasgow, Escocia.   Darby adoptó las supuestas revelaciones de McDonald, elaborándolas y difundiéndolas como propias  (es decir, sin dar a conocer su origen).  Alrededor de 1834, Darby rompió toda relación con la Iglesia Anglicana, y partir de 1850, comenzó a difundir por escrito las ideas escatológicas del Círculo de Albury y de Margaret McDonald.

Entre 1862 y 1877, Darby realizó siete viajes a Norteamérica para dar conferencias sobre profecías bíblicas.  Los escritos de Darby influyeron grandemente en Henry Moorehouse (de los “Hermanos”), quien a su vez influyó en Dwight L. MoodyDarby también influyó directamente en  James H. Brookes y en C. I. Scofield (y en las anotaciones a la Biblia que este último produjo y publicó bajo el título Biblia anotada por Scofield).

 Principales fuentes:

DALLIMORE, Andrew.  The Life of Edward Irving.  The Fore-Runner of the Charismatic Movement.  Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1983.

Douglas, J. D., ed.  The New Internacional Dictionary of the Christian Church.  Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1978.

Grau, José.  Curso de formación teológica evangélica, Vol. VII: Escatología I (Amilenial). Barcelona: CLIE, 1977; pp. 172-185.

McPHERSON, Dave. The Incredible Cover-Up: The True Story of the Pre-Trib Rapture.  New Jersey: Logos International, 1975.

Murray, Ian.  The Puritan Hope: Revival and the Interpretation of Prophecy.  Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1971.

PIERCE, Robert L.  The Rapture Cult.  Religious Zeal And Political Conspiracy.  Disponible en: http://www.reformed-theology.org/html/books/rapture/index.html

WARFIELD, B. B.  “Irvingite Gifts.”  Disponible en: http://christianbeliefs.org/books/cm/cm-irving.html

WESTON, C. G.  Analyzing Scofield.  Disponible en: http://www.gospeltruth.net/scofield.htm

“The Catholic Origins of Futurism and Preterism.”  Disponible en: http://www.aloha.net/~mikesch/antichrist.htm.

 

[1] Este libro está disponible para su estudio en la Biblioteca James White en Michigan.

[2] Belarmino escribió dos catecismos y varios libros; llegó a ser el principal apologista de catolicismo-romano postridentino (es decir, posterior al Concilio de Trento que oficializó la postura anti-reformada de la Iglesia Romana); fue también asesor y funcionario de las cortes papales de Sixto V, Clemente VIII, y Paulo V, llegó a ser cardenal de Capua, y estuvo cerca de ser nombrado papa.  Pío XI lo canonizó en 1930, y en 1931 y lo declaró “Doctor de la Iglesia.”

[3] Recientemente ha sido reimpreso bajo el título A treatise of Antichrist.  Conteyning the defence of Cardinall Bellarmines arguments, which inuincible demonstrate, that the pope is not Antichrist.  Against George Downam by Michael Christopherson priest…, Volume 1 of 2 by Michael Walpole (1570-1624?), reimpresión de una edición de 1613, hecha en 1974, por Scolar Press Limited, Ilkley, England, ISBN 0859672042.

[4] Disponible en: http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/FichaAutor.html?Ref=3479&portal=3

[5] De Lacunza tuvo que dejar el continente americano durante la expulsión de los jesuitas, y en 1824 su libro fue incluido en el Index librorum prohibitorum.

[6] En Londres, Irving conoció y se hizo amigo del poeta inglés de la corriente del romanticismo Samuel Taylor ColeridgeColeridge persuadió a Irving de su pesimismo y de que el mundo empeoraría cada vez más hasta encontrarse pronto bajo el inminente juicio de Dios.  En mayo de 1824, para el aniversario de la Sociedad Misionera de Londres, Irving predicó un sermón que causó reacciones encontradas por su contenido profético pesimista.  En 1825 Irving cayó bajo la influencia de James Hatley Frere (ver infra nota al pie 6) quien lo convirtió al premilenialismo, y a la idea de una segunda venida “invisible” del Señor.  También en 1825, Irving dio una conferencia para la Sociedad Continental que levaba el mismo título que su libro Babilon and Infidelity Foredoomed.  En dicho libro pronosticó la inminente venida de una serie de juicios y “temibles perplejidades” en preparación a “la inminente venida de Cristo y de Su reino.” También advertía que el trabajo misionero, especialmente en el sur de Europa (donde se concentraban los esfuerzos de la Sociedad Continental) era inútil, pues el juicio de Dios caería pronto sobre estas tierras del otrora Imperio Romano.  La navidad de ese mismo 1825, Irving comenzó a enseñar a su numerosa congregación las especulaciones escatológicas de Frere.

[7] En 1815 Frere publicó un libro titulado Una perspectiva combinada de las profecías de Daniel, Esdras, y San Juan (el Esdras referido no es el libro canónico sino el libro apócrifo de 2º de Esdras).  Dicho libro contiene la afirmación, sin precedente en la historia de la Iglesia, de que la segunda venida del Señor no sería un evento literal sino espiritual (invisible), y que ocurriría entre 1822 y 1823.  Ningún ministro, predicador, ni mucho menos teólogo, lo tomó en serio,  hasta que logró convencer a Irving.

[8] M. Lacunza, The Coming of Messiah.  Preliminary Discourse by the transl. by E. Irving (L. B. Seely and Son, London, 1827), 2 vols.  Algunos extractos relevantes para el asunto de referencia están disponibles en: http://www.aloha.net/~mikesch/antichrist.htm.

[9] Aunque puede decirse que, en algún sentido, el pentecostalismo y carismatismo son una versión moderna de la antigua herejía montanista, no deja de haber invenciones novedosas en dichas expresiones modernas.  Fue A. J. Scott quién primero implantó en Irving las ideas carismáticas de dos estadíos en la vida cristiana, el primero siendo la regeneración, y el segundo siendo el bautismo del Espíritu Santo evidenciado mediante el ejercicio del “don de lenguas.”

[10] En la misma dirección herética, Irvin publicó en 1830 The Orthodox and Catholic Doctrine of Our Lord’s Human Nature (La doctrina ortodoxa y católica de la naturaleza humana de nuestro Señor).

[11] Henry Drummond (1786-1860), influyentísimo aristócrata, político, y banquero británico; asociado con los movimientos sionista, anglo-israelista, carismático y premilenialista.  Tuvo una “experiencia religiosa” en 1817.  A partir de entonces se unió a la Sociedad Continental y otras agencias evangélicas.  Auspició los congresos proféticos de Albury Park (nombre de su mansión campirana) de 1826 a 1830.

[12] Margaret McDonald, “predicadora” pentecostal escocesa de Port Glasgow, Escocia.  A final de los 1820’s, la familia McDonald alcanzó notoriedad en su comunidad por realizar milagros de sanidad y hablar en lenguas.  En abril de 1830, a la edad de quince años, tuvo una “visión profética” en la que se dividía la segunda venida del Señor en dos partes, y se hablaba de un inminente “rapto secreto” de creyentes antes de la aparición del anticristo y la “tribulación.”  Esta fue la primera aparición de esta idea en toda la historia del cristianismo.  McDonald le comunicó sus visiones a Irving, quien las promovió (sin mencionar su origen) ese mismo año en el congreso profético en Powerscourt Castle (a las afueras de Dublín, Irlanda).  Ver Dave McPherson, The Incredible Cover-Up: The True Story of the Pre-Trib Rapture, New Jersey: Logos International, 1975.  MacPherson cita profusamente el libro La restauración de los apóstoles y profetas: En la Iglesia Apostólica Católica, escrito en 1861 por el Rev. Robert Norton, médico, clérigo y miembro de la Catholic Apostolic Church (la secta fundada por Edward Irving).

[13] En 1830 Irving fue citado por el Presbiterio de Londres (Iglesia de Escocia) para responder acerca de su enseñanza herética sobre la supuesta naturaleza pecaminosa del Señor Jesucristo, exhortándolo a que se arrepintiera.  Por toda respuesta Irving se separó del Presbiterio (con todo y congregación y templo) pretextando la apostasía de la Iglesia, y fundó junto con Henry Drummond la “Iglesia Apostólica Católica” (precursora de los movimientos y sectas carismático-pentecostales).  En 1832, Irving y sus seguidores fueron lanzados del edificio de Regent Square, perteneciente a la Iglesia de Escocia, y el año siguiente Irving fue depuesto del ministerio por dicha Iglesia.

 

[Ver también: Amplicación en el Nuevo Testamento de la noción judía del Reino de Dios y de Jerusalén como su sede; La profecía de las setenta “semanas” de Daniel 9:20-27La proclamación del reino en los evangelios sinópticos (incluyendo el significado de las parábolas del reino en Mateo 13 y Marcos 4)Origen de la expresión bíblica “postreros días” o “últimos tiempos” (eschaton)El reino del Mesías y Su IglesiaEste mundo está lleno del poder redentor de DiosLa historia de la redención: Del protoevangelio al reinado universal del MesíasEl comienzo de los postreros días en PentecostésExaltación y entronización del Señor JesucristoEl reino universal del Mesías (Salmo 72:8-11)La profecía de Noé (Gen. 9:25-27) y su cumplimiento en el Nuevo TestamentoDos acercamientos al estudio de la Biblia: teología sistemática y teología bíblica (con análisis literario).]

_________________

Alejandro Moreno Morrison, de nacionalidad mexicana, es un abogado y teólogo reformado. Fue educado en la Escuela Libre de Derecho (México), Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando, y la Universidad de Oxford.  En Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando fue asistente del Rev. Dr. Richard L. Pratt, y del Rev. Dr. Ronald H. Nash.  Ha ministrado como maestro de doctrina cristiana y Biblia y como predicador en diversas iglesias y misiones de denominaciones como la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana Conservadora de México, la Presbyterian Church in America, la Presbyterian Church of Ireland, y la Reformed Presbyterian Church North America Synod.  Con esta última estuvo a cargo de una misión durante 2014.  También ha sido profesor invitado de Teología Sistemática, Ética, Evangelismo, y Apologética en el Seminario Teológico Reformado de la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, y de Sistemas Políticos Contemporáneos en la Facultad de Derecho de la UNAM (El reino universal del Mesías (Salmo 72:8-11)México).  Desde 2010 es profesor adjunto de Filosofía del Derecho en la Escuela Libre de Derecho.