Vindiciae Legis, or A Vindication of the Morall Law and the Covenants (PDF)

By Anthony Burgess.

Link to PDF file:

BURGESS, Anthony. A Vindication of the Moral Law and the Covenants (1647)

Introductory note by Alejandro Moreno Morrison

The full subtitle of the original edition is: A Vindication of the Morall Law and the Covenants, From the Errours of Papists, Arminians, Socinians, and more especially, Antinomians. In XXX Lectures, preached at Laurence-Jury, London. This facsimile edition is taken from second edition, corrected and augmented (London: James Young, 1647), and published by Reformation Heritage Books (Grand Rapids, 2011).

On the crucial importance and unique significance of this book as a testimony of the true Reformed Christianity, and more particularly of the true Reformed Presbyterianism that is faithful to the Westminster Standards, Stephen J. Casselli writes the following in the third page of the “Introduction” to the facsimile edition shared above:

On January 25, 1645, [Anthony Burgess] was elected vicar of the Guildhall church of St. Lawrence Jewry, where his lectures on the law would eventually be delivered. The timing for the call and delivery of these lectures is significant. Burgess delivered these lectures in the midst of the Assembly’s discussion and debates regarding the law of God, and Vindiciae legis provides exegetical and theological rationale, consonant with the teaching of chapter XIX of the Westminster Confession of Faith.

In footnote 11, Casselli further elaborates:

The foreword preceding the title page of Vindiciae legis calling for the publication of Burgess’s lectures is dated June 11, 1646, and this is a significant clue to understanding its historical milieu. It is clear that the lectures were delivered some time in the months preceding June of 1646. This is important because we also know that on November 18, 1645, the writing of the section on the law for the Confession of Faith was referred to the third committee, of which Anthony Burgess was a member. A report on the law was then made to the plenary session by John Wincop on January 7, 9, 12, 13, 29, and February 2 and 9, 1646…

Casselli’s sources are Alex F. Mitchel & John Sturthers, eds., The Minutes of the Sessions of the Westminster Assembly of Divines (Edinburgh: William Blackwood & Sons, 1847; p. 178); and Benjamin B. Warfield, The Westminster Assembly and Its Work (New York: Oxford University Press, 1931; p. 112).

It is worth noting that the “Antinomian Errours” circulating in England around 1645-6 were connected to the moral scepticism and antinomianism that developed in Lutheran circles in the 17th century.  In his book Natural Law and Moral Philosophy: From Grotius to the Scottish Enlightenment (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996; pp. 25-6), Knud Haakonssen explains as follows the line of thought of such moral scepticism and antinomianism:

Nothing that a person can be or make of himself will justify him before God; only faith justifies, and that only by God’s grace. Our duty towards God is thus infinite, and we may view our temporal life as a network of unfulfillable duties, which natural law theory may put into systematic form and give such worldly justification as our limited understanding permits. On the other hand, if our duty is really infinite and unfulfillable, then it is hard to see it as a possible guide to action; it provides no criterion for what behaviour to choose. We therefore can live only by faith. This strongly antinomian line was adopted by a great many sects at the Reformation and later and must undoubtedly be regarded as a target no less important than moral scepticism for Protestant natural law theory.

Also in his Introduction to this facsimilar edition, Casselli explains that in Burgess’s lectures the:

…development of the doctrine of the law and the covenants was worked out by the careful exegesis of particular texts, including detailed attention to grammatical and lexical features of the text. [Also]…thoughtful dialogue with the catholic theology of the Western church, a sophisticated interaction with contemporary interpretive traditions, and eye to ecclesiastical concerns, and a sensitivity to the progress of revelation leading to its culmination in the person and work of Jesus Christ…

Anuncios

Introducción al Apocalipsis, 5ª parte (audio)

Por Alejandro Moreno Morrison.

Sermón predicado en la misión presbiteriana “Adulam” (Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México), en Taxco, Guerrero, en el otoño de 2011.

Enlace al archivo de audio: Introducción al Apocalipsis, 5ª parte (AMM, otoño 2011).

_______________________

Ver también: Introducción al Apocalipsis, 1ª parte (audio)Introducción al Apocalipsis, 4ª parte (audio)Serie de sermones de Hechos 1:1 al 2:41 (audios)Paralelismo o recapitulación en las visiones apocalípticas de Daniel (cuadro comparativo)La profecía de las setenta “semanas” (Daniel 9:20-27)Orígenes jesuitas y pentecostales del dispensacionalismo.

__________________

Alejandro Moreno Morrison, de nacionalidad mexicana, es un abogado y teólogo reformado.  Fue educado en la Escuela Libre de Derecho (México), el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando, y la Universidad de Oxford.  En el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando fue asistente del Rev. Dr. Richard L. Pratt, y del Rev. Dr. Ronald H. Nash.  Ha ministrado como maestro de doctrina cristiana y Biblia y como predicador en diversas iglesias y misiones de varias denominaciones incluyendo la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana Conservadora de México, la Presbyterian Church of America, la Presbyterian Church of Ireland, y la Reformed Presbyterian Church North America Synod.  Con esta última estuvo a cargo de una misión durante 2014.  También ha sido profesor invitado de Teología Sistemática, Ética, Evangelismo, y Apologética en el Seminario Teológico Reformado de la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, y de Sistemas Políticos Contemporáneos en la Facultad de Derecho de la UNAM (México).  Desde 2010 es profesor adjunto de Filosofía del Derecho en la Escuela Libre de Derecho.

Introducción al Apocalipsis, 4ª parte (audio)

Por Alejandro Moreno Morrison.

Sermón predicado en la misión presbiteriana “Adulam” (Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México), en Taxco, Guerrero, el otoño de 2011.

Enlace al archivo de audio: Introducción al Apocalipsis, 4ª parte (AMM, otoño 2011).

__________________

Ver también: La fe de los estatistasIntroducción al Apocalipsis, 1ª parte (audio)Contraste entre los linajes de Caín (simiente de la serpiente) y de Set (simiente de la mujer)Serie de sermones de Hechos 1:1 al 2:41 (audios)Paralelismo o recapitulación en las visiones apocalípticas de Daniel (cuadro comparativo)La profecía de las setenta “semanas” (Daniel 9:20-27)Orígenes jesuitas y pentecostales del dispensacionalismo.

__________________

Alejandro Moreno Morrison, de nacionalidad mexicana, es un abogado y teólogo reformado.  Fue educado en la Escuela Libre de Derecho (México), el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando, y la Universidad de Oxford.  En el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando fue asistente del Rev. Dr. Richard L. Pratt, y del Rev. Dr. Ronald H. Nash.  Ha ministrado como maestro de doctrina cristiana y Biblia y como predicador en diversas iglesias y misiones de varias denominaciones incluyendo la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana Conservadora de México, la Presbyterian Church of America, la Presbyterian Church of Ireland, y la Reformed Presbyterian Church North America Synod.  Con esta última estuvo a cargo de una misión durante 2014.  También ha sido profesor invitado de Teología Sistemática, Ética, Evangelismo, y Apologética en el Seminario Teológico Reformado de la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, y de Sistemas Políticos Contemporáneos en la Facultad de Derecho de la UNAM (México).  Desde 2010 es profesor adjunto de Filosofía del Derecho en la Escuela Libre de Derecho.

La ley natural en el libro “Lex, rex” de Samuel Rutherford

Por Samuel Rutherford.

(Introducción, selección y traducción por Alejandro Moreno Morrison)

Introducción

En su libro Lex, rex; la ley y el príncipe, Samuel Rutherford utiliza 104 veces la expresión law of nature (ley de la naturaleza), 20 veces nature’s law (ley de la naturaleza), una vez “nature’s laws” (leyes de la naturaleza), y cinco veces nature’s light (luz de la naturaleza) en sentido normativo, como ley de conducta.  Además de estas ocasiones en las que dichas expresiones aparecen tal cual, existen muchas otras instancias en las que Rutherford describe como “natural” un deber, obligación, o conducta buena o sensata.[1]

A continuación algunos fragmentos que muestran de la manera en que Rutherford suscribe y usa la doctrina clásica del derecho o ley natural (o iusnaturalismo) en su Lex, rex.[2]

————————————–

Fragmentos de Lex, rex sobre la ley natural

Lo que está avalado por la dirección de la luz de la naturaleza está sustentado por la ley de la naturaleza, y consecuentemente por una ley divina; ¿pues quién puede negar que la ley de la naturaleza es una ley divina? [I, p. 1].

 

La esclavitud de siervos a señores o amos, tal y como fue antaño entre los judíos, no es natural, sino contra natura…  2. La esclavitud no debió existir en el mundo, si el hombre nunca hubiese pecado, como tampoco hubiera existido la compra y venta de hombre, que es una consecuencia miserable del pecado y una especia de muerte, cuando hombres son puestos bajo los dolores fatigosos del empleado, quien anhela la sombra, y bajo trillos de hierro y sierra, y a cortar madera, y sacar agua continuamente…   4.  Un hombre hecho conforme a la imagen de Dios, es res sacra, algo sagrado, y por la ley de la naturaleza no puede ser vendido y comprado como no puede serlo algo religioso y sagrado dedicado a Dios [XIII, p. 94].

 

Cuando el pueblo nombraba a alguien para ser su rey, la voz de la naturaleza exponía su título legal, aunque no hubiese pacto verbal o escrito; puesto que ese hecho—hacer un rey—es un acto moral legítimo respaldado por la palabra de Dios (Deut. xvii. 15, 16; Rom. xiii. 1, 2) y la ley de la naturaleza; y, por lo tanto, habiendo hecho a tal hombre su rey, le han dado poder para ser su padre, su proveedor, sanador, y protector; y por lo tanto no sólo deben haberlo hecho rey condicionalmente, para que sea su padre, proveedor, y tutor.  Ahora, si este título legal de hacer un rey ha de ser expuesto como invistiendo con un poder absoluto, y no condicional, este hecho será contrario a la Escritura y a la ley de la naturaleza; puesto que si le han dado absolutamente poder real, y sin ninguna condición, entonces tuvieron que haberle dado poder para ser un padre, protector, tutor, y para ser un tirano, un asesino, un león sanguinario para devastar y destruir al pueblo de Dios [XIV, pp. 108-109].

 

Así como Dios, en una ley de la naturaleza, ha dado a cada hombre la guarda y preservación de sí mismo y de su hermano, Caín debió en su lugar ser el guarda de Abel su hermano; así también Dios ha encargado la preservación del estado, mediante una ley positiva, no al rey solo, puesto que eso es imposible. (Num. xi. 14, 17; 2 Cro. xix. l–6, 1 Cro. xxvii.) [XXI, p. 175].

 

Así como las Escrituras en todos los fundamentos son claras, y se exponen a sí mismas, y actu primo condenan herejías, así también, todas las leyes de los hombres en sus fundamentos, que es la ley de la naturaleza y de las naciones, son claras; y, 2.  La tiranía es más visible e inteligible que la herejía, y es pronto discernida.  Si un rey trae contra sus súbditos nacionales veinte mil turcos armados, y el rey los lidera, es evidente que no vienen a hacer una visita amistosa para saludar al reino y partir en paz.  El pueblo tiene un trono natural de gobierno en su conciencia para alertar, y materialmente dictar sentencia contra el rey como un tirano, y así por naturaleza han de defenderse a sí mismos.  En donde la tiranía es más oscura, y el hilo pequeño, de manera que escapa a la vista del hombre, el rey mantiene su posesión; pero niego que la tiranía pueda ser oscura por mucho tiempo [XXIV, p. 210].

 

…la reserva de este poder de defensa no ha de ser necesariamente expresada en el contrato entre el rey y el pueblo.  Las exigencias de la ley natural no pueden ser plasmadas en pactos positivos, se presuponen [XXIV, p. 211].

 

La supremacía del pueblo es una ley de la auto-preservación de la naturaleza, por encima de todo derecho positivo, y por encima del rey, y está para regular la soberanía, no para destruirla.  Si esta supremacía de majestad estaba en el pueblo antes de que tuviesen un rey, entonces, 1. No la pierdan por la elección voluntaria de un rey; pues un rey se escoge para el bien, no para la merma del pueblo, por lo tanto, deben retener este poder, en hábito y potencia, aun cuando tengan un rey.  2.  Luego entonces la supremacía de la majestad no es un rayo de divinidad propio de un rey solamente.  3.  Luego entonces el pueblo, teniendo virtualmente soberanía real en ellos, hacen, y también deshacen a un rey [XXIV, p. 211].

 

Para esta [interpretación] pública [de la ley], la ley tiene una regla fundamental, salus populi, como el rey de los planetas, el sol, que da su luz astral a todas las leyes, y mediante la cual son expuestas: cualquier interpretación que se aparte ya sea de las leyes fundamentales de gobierno, o de la ley de la naturaleza, y de la ley de las naciones, y específicamente de la seguridad del público, ha de ser rechazada como una perversión de la ley; y por lo tanto, conscientia humani generis, la consciencia natural de todos los hombres, a la cual el pueblo oprimido puede apelar cuando el rey expone una ley injustamente, a su gusto, es la última regla sobre la tierra para exponer las leyes [XXVII, p. 245].

 

Si mi prójimo viene a matarme, y no puedo salvar mi vida huyendo, puedo defenderme; y todos los teólogos dicen que puedo matarlo en lugar de ser yo asesinado, porque yo soy más cercano, por la ley de la naturaleza, y más estimado para mí mismo y mi propia vida es más estimada que la de mi hermano [XXX, p. 278].

 

Por la ley de la naturaleza un gobernante es nombrado para defender al inocente [XXXI, p. 291].

 

Nada ha de hacerse en palabra o en hecho tendiente al deshonor del rey; ahora bien resistirlo en defensa propia, siendo un mandamiento de Dios en la ley de la naturaleza, no puede luchar contra el otro mandamiento de honrar al rey, así como el quinto mandamiento no puede luchar contra el sexto; pues toda resistencia es contra el juez, como alguien que está excediendo los límites de su oficio, es a ese respecto que es resistido, no como juez [XXXIV, p. 313].

 

La ley de la naturaleza y la ley divina prueban que a cada siervo y ministro debe pagársele su salario [XLIV, p. 412].

[1] El teonomista Greg Bahnsen dice que “el énfasis en la ley natural de los escolásticos medievales [fue] repudiado y controvertido por la Reforma” (Theonomy in Christian Ethics, Phillipsburg: Presbyterian & Reformed, p. 399).  Bahnsen es un claro ejemplo, y quizá la principal fuente, de la profunda ignorancia que hoy existe en círculos reformados en el continente americano acerca de la ley natural o derecho natural.  La afirmación citada es absolutamente falsa, como lo demuestra el uso que reformadores como Juan Calvino, Samuel Rutherford, y la Asamblea de Westminster hicieron de la doctrina del derecho natural (ver: La doctrina de luz de la naturaleza en el libro “La ley divina para el gobierno eclesiástico”Calvino sobre la ley natural (conocimiento innato de las semillas de equidad y justicia) para el gobierno del estado y el orden socialCalvino sobre la ley natural y contra el teonomismoAnthony Burgess sobre la ley natural (Romanos 2:14-15)).

[2] Los números de página corresponden a la edición publicada por Portage Publications, disponible gratuitamente en: http://www.portagepub.com/dl/caa/sr-lexrex17.pdf.

_____________

Ver también:  Samuel Rutherford (1600-1661) erudito, pastor, teólogo, pactante y comisionado escocés a la Asamblea de WestminsterJuan Altusio (1557-1638), filósofo, jurista, teólogo, y estadista ReformadoInfluencia del calvinismo y del puritanismo en el pensamiento político de las colonias británicas en el norte de América (siglos XVII y XVIII)La fe de los estatistasLa doctrina de la luz de la naturaleza en el libro “La ley divina para el gobierno eclesiástico”Calvino sobre la ley natural (conocimiento innato de las semillas de equidad y justicia) para el gobierno del estado y el orden socialCalvino sobre la ley natural y contra el teonomismoAnthony Burgess sobre la ley natural (Romanos 2:14-15)Cronología de las obras de C. S. Lewis que refutan al positivismo, al conductismo y al subjetivismo ético, y de las interacciones entre B. F. Skinner y Lewis.

Los puritanos del S. XVII y las ciencias, la cultura, y la educación

Por Alejandro Moreno Morrison.

Fragmento tomado y ligeramente revisado de Alejandro Moreno Morrison, La objetividad del deber ser: Reflexiones en respuesta a la tesis subjetivista del positivismo jurídico (tesis profesional, Escuela Libre de Derecho, México, 1998), pp. 179-180 (Cap. IV, 1).

Leland Ryken explica que, “creyendo en la revelación general de Dios, los puritanos, abrazaron por completo el estudio científico del universo físico”.[1]  En su libro Ciencia y fe ¿en conflicto?,[2] el escritor español Enrique Mota señala que el 62% de los miembros de la Royal Society durante 1663 eran puritanos,[3] aun cuando este movimiento de reformadores calvinistas constituía una minoría de la población inglesa tras la restauración de la monarquía.

El pastor y teólogo escocés Samuel Rutherford [4] (1600-1661) escribió: “El creyente es el hombre más razonable en el mundo; aquél que hace todo por fe, hace todo por la luz de una razón cuerda.”[5]  El pastor puritano inglés Richard Baxter (1615-1691) escribió: “Nuestra física, que es una magnífica parte del aprendizaje humano, no es sino el conocimiento de las admirables obras de Dios; ¿y tiene alguien la cara para llamarse criatura de Dios, e infamar empero como vano el aprendizaje humano?”[6]  Richard Bernard insistía que “gramática, retórica, lógica, física, matemáticas, metafísica, ética, política, economía, historia y disciplina militar,” eran todas útiles para un ministro.[7]

Los puritanos fundadores de la colonia de la Bahía de Massachusetts establecieron Harvard College en 1636, sólo seis años después de haber desembarcado.[8]  El historiador E. Digby Baltzell, comenta que dicha colonia, “con más de 100 graduados de Oxford y Cambridge, fue seguramente la comunidad mejor educada que el mundo ha conocido jamás, antes o desde entonces.”[9]  En este mismo sentido Max Weber escribió: “Quizá ningún país estuvo jamás tan lleno de graduados como Nueva Inglaterra en la primera generación de su existencia.”[10]

El historiador del S. XX Horton Davies describe al Puritanismo como un movimiento de los ‘piadosos instruidos,’ los intelectuales religiosos de la época, un movimiento que encontró su más fuerte apoyo en los círculos universitarios.[11]

Uno de los últimos puritanos fue el pastor, teólogo, filósofo y científico Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758), profesor en Yale y presidente de la Universidad de Princeton.  Acerca de Edwards, el profesor Benjamín Silliman expresó la opinión de que “si él se hubiera dedicado a la ciencia física, podría haber agregado otro Newton a la extraordinaria época en que comenzó su carrera.”[12]  J. I. Packer ha escrito que “el puritanismo es lo que Edwards fue.”[13]

En general, C. S. Lewis describe a los primeros puritanos como “jóvenes, impetuosos, intelectuales progresivos, muy destacados y al día.”[14]

[1] Leland Ryken, The Puritans As They Really Were, 2nd ed., (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1990), p. 168.  Para una investigación sobre la influencia de los puritanos en la ciencia moderna ver: Robert K. Merton, Science, Technology, and Society in Seventeenth Century England (New York: Howard Fertig, 1970); Christopher Hill, Intellectual Origins of the English Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1965); John Dillenberger, Protestant Thought and Natural Science (Garden City: Doubleday, 1960).

[2] Barcelona: Andamio, 1995.

[3] Op. cit., p. 40.  Referido en Antonio Cruz, Postmodernidad (Barcelona: CLIE, 1996), p. 31.  Mota también señala que, durante el S. XVI, y también en la actualidad, el número de científicos protestantes en Bélgica era, y es, mucho mayor que el de católicos, aunque éstos últimos son mayoría en la nación.

[4] Aunque el calificativo puritano no se aplica a los presbiterianos escoceses de la misma época sino sólo a los presbiterianos (y otros calvinistas) ingleses e irlandeses, su manera de vivir y de pensar era la misma, como lo demuestra los estándares de la Asamblea de Westminster (La confesión de fe de Westminster y sus catecismos entre otros), que fue producto de los puritanos ingleses y los presbiterianos escoceses.

[5] A Sermon Preached to the Honorable House of Commons.  Citado en Ryken, op. cit., p. 4.

[6] The Unreasonableness of Infidelity.  Citado en Ryken, op. cit., p. 168.

[7] The Faithful Shepherd.  Citado en Ryken, op. cit., p. 165.

[8] Ryken explica que los estudiantes que se preparaban para el ministerio cristiano en Harvard, “no sólo aprendían a leer la Biblia en sus lenguas originales y a exponer teología, sino también estudios en matemáticas, astronomía, física, botánica, química, filosofía, poesía, historia y medicina” (Ryken, op. cit.); ver también Benjamin Hart, Faith and Freedom: The Christian Roots of American Liberty (Dallas: Lewis & Stanley, 1988), pp. 107-109.

[9] E. Digby Baltzell, Puritan Boston and Quaker Philadelphia (New York: The Free Press, 1979), p. 247.  Citado en Ryken, op. cit., p.7.

[10] Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (New York: Scribner, 1930); p. 168.  Citado en Ryken, op. cit., p.225

[11] Horton Davies, Worship and Theology in England: From Cranmer to Hooker, 1534-1603 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1970), p. 285.

[12] Henry C. McCook, “Jonathan Edwards as a Naturalist,” Presbyterian and Reformed Review, I; p. 393.  Ver Brevísima nota biográfica sobre Jonathan Edwards.

[13] James I. Packer, A Quest for Godliness: The Puritan Vision of the Christian Life (Wheaton: Crossway Books, 1990), p. 310.

[14] C. S. Lewis, Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1966), p. 121.  Citado en Ryken, op. cit., p. 4.

____________

Ver: Samuel Rutherford (1600-1661) erudito, pastor, teólogo, pactante y comisionado escocés a la Asamblea de WestminsterInfluencia del calvinismo y del puritanismo en el pensamiento político de las colonias británicas en el norte de América (siglos XVII y XVIII)Anthony Burgess sobre la ley natural (Romanos 2:14-15)¿Cómo eran los puritanos originales?Puritanismo como un movimiento de avivamiento, 1 (a)Presbiterianismo en la primera reforma en InglaterraAlgunas objeciones al cientismo.

__________________________

Alejandro Moreno Morrison, de nacionalidad mexicana, es un abogado y teólogo reformado.  Fue educado en la Escuela Libre de Derecho (México), el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando, y la Universidad de Oxford.  En el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando fue asistente del Rev. Dr. Richard L. Pratt, y del Rev. Dr. Ronald H. Nash.  Ha ministrado como maestro de doctrina cristiana y Biblia y como predicador en diversas iglesias y misiones de denominaciones como la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana Conservadora de México, la Presbyterian Church in America, la Presbyterian Church of Ireland, y la Reformed Presbyterian Church North America Synod.  Con esta última estuvo a cargo de una misión durante 2014.  También ha sido profesor invitado de Teología Sistemática, Ética, Evangelismo, y Apologética en el Seminario Teológico Reformado de la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, y de Sistemas Políticos Contemporáneos en la Facultad de Derecho de la UNAM (México).  Desde 2010 es profesor adjunto de Filosofía del Derecho en la Escuela Libre de Derecho.

Sermón expositivo de Génesis 4:26, antecedente AT de invocar el nombre del Señor (audio)

Por Alejandro Moreno Morrison.

Domingo 7 de septiembre de 2014.

Enlace al archivo de audio: Sermón de Génesis 4:26, antecedente AT de invocar el nombre del Señor (AMM; Sep. 7, 2014).

Lecturas del culto:

  1. Antiguo Testamento: Génesis 4:16-26
  2. Evangelio: Lucas 18:35-43
  3. Nuevo Testamento: Romanos 10:8-13

Texto en la portada del orden de culto: Contraste entre los linajes de Caín (simiente de la serpiente) y de Set (simiente de la mujer).

Texto en la contraportada del orden de culto: Invocar el nombre de Jehová (Génesis 4:26).

Otro texto alusivo: La correcta interpretación de Romanos 10:9-10.

_______________________

Ver también: Serie de sermones de Hechos 1:1 al 2:41 (audios)Dos acercamientos al estudio de la Biblia: teología sistemática y teología bíblica (con análisis literario)La fe de los estatistasArrepentimiento en respuesta al sermón de PentecostésGanancias y pérdidas (Filipenses 3:7-9)Sermón de Rut 1, antecedente AT de invocar el nombre del Señor (audio)Sermón temático: Sola gracia (audio).

_______________________

Alejandro Moreno Morrison, de nacionalidad mexicana, es un abogado y teólogo reformado.  Fue educado en la Escuela Libre de Derecho (México), el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando, y la Universidad de Oxford.  En el Reformed Theological Seminary Orlando fue asistente del Rev. Dr. Richard L. Pratt, y del Rev. Dr. Ronald H. Nash.  Ha ministrado como maestro de doctrina cristiana y Biblia y como predicador en diversas iglesias y misiones de denominaciones como la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana de México, la Iglesia Nacional Presbiteriana Conservadora de México, la Presbyterian Church in America, la Presbyterian Church of Ireland, y la Reformed Presbyterian Church North America Synod.  Con esta último estuvo a cargo de una misión durante 2014.  También ha sido profesor invitado de Teología Sistemática, Ética, Evangelismo, y Apologética en el Seminario Teológico Reformado de la Iglesia Presbiteriana Reformada de México, y de Sistemas Políticos Contemporáneos en la Facultad de Derecho de la UNAM (México).  Desde 2010 es profesor adjunto de Filosofía del Derecho en la Escuela Libre de Derecho.